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Magistrate's Folly by Our Own Lisa Richardson


by Dina Sleiman

The Magistrate’s Folly by our own Lisa Richardson takes an intriguing look at Colonial life from the cheerful streets of Williamsburg to the dark side of slavery. I was pleasantly surprised that this little Heartsong book dealt with such realistic topics and deep themes. The book examines justice in all it’s many forms: from the English justice system, to the balance of justice and mercy, to the injustice of slavery.

Here is the official blurb:

But when she fails to prove her case, she's convicted of larceny and sent to colonial Virginia as an indentured servant. Now she must find a way to survive an ocean away from her beloved home in England…and a way to silence her heart. She couldn't help but recognize the magistrate, Graham Sinclair—her first love until he disappeared from her life. Far from healing old wounds, his sudden reappearance has brought nothing but fresh hurt.

Ever since condemning Merry, Graham is haunted by her memory. When he discovers her innocence, he obtains a pardon and pursues her. But by then Merry is embroiled in a new mystery—one that Graham won't let her face alone.

Together they hunt down a killer to save a friend…and their future.

There is never a dull moment in this book. It’s a power packed novel full of intrigue, adventure, and suspense. Not to mention a healthy dose of romance.

For me, perhaps my favorite part was the Williamsburg setting. I loved seeing the beautiful old city brought to life. I’ve toured it many times, and I could picture it throughout my reading of the book.

I also loved the fact that the author did not turn a blind eye to the injustices of this time. The heroine is drawn into danger and intrigue when she tries to help the Negro slaves in the home where she herself is enslaved as an indentured servant.

If you’re looking for a light, sappy, romance, this might not be the one. LOL. This novel is elegantly written, superbly crafted, and full of memorable characters, excitement, and depth. Which means, of course, I loved it and highly recommend it :)

Comments

  1. In a matter of pure coincidence, I have a post today about "Historical Romance in The American South" on Southern Writers, and I mention Lisa's book there too :) http://southernwritersmagazine.blogspot.com/

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  2. I totally love this book. Aside from the Williamsburg setting, my favorite part of this book is how far Merry is willing to go to help others.

    Wonderful review, Dina. I will read your other post after work.

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  3. Yes, Merry is an incredible character.

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  4. Great review, Dina. Lisa is a talented writer and the premise of this book intrigued me from the start. I've been waiting for this book for a long time.

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  5. I'm so looking forward to reading this! I just need more reading time... :)

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  6. Ack, me, too! But I really am looking forward to this one. June, please God, is going to be my reading month. I will have finished with my deadlines (I hope!). :)

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  7. I realized last night that it's so much easier for me to read books on my Kindle... but Lisa's book is up next. That means I have to sit in a chair--next to a lamp--and read instead of lie in bed and read in the dark.

    I can't wait for this one. I read part of it years ago. ACK! we've all been waiting and this is a sweet moment indeed!

    Thank you Lisa for the shout out to the Inkies inside Magistrate's Folly!

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  8. Thanks so much for your kind words everyone and especially Dina! I so so appreciate it. You are all so encouraging and I hope those of you haven't read it yet will enjoy it too.

    Sorry I'm just now commenting. I wish I had managed to get here sooner today, but I was caught up at work.

    Hugs to you all!

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  9. " The book examines justice in all it’s many forms: from the English justice system,".
    Yes, that is not the easiest subject to explore considering how different it is from other justice systems- yet that difference can be a good thing...

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