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THE FASHION DESIGNER by Nancy Moser, Review by Paula Shreckhise

The Fashion Designer by Nancy Moser is the second book in a series about a group of women who are involved in changes in women’s fashions around 1912. The first book is The Pattern Artist. It would be best to read The Pattern Artist first as The Fashion Designer builds on the people and relationships of the first book. 

I would recommend this book for those interested in sewing and early 20th Century fashion. Have you wondered about the beginnings of such fashion brands as Lane Bryant? Or how women went from custom made dresses to off-the-rack or ready to wear clothes? How did the first pattern companies come about?

The Fashion Designer follows Annie Culver and her friends as they try to realize their dream to bring clothes of ease and comfort to the average woman. Through their quest to open a dress shop, their faith is tested. But God is shown as an integral part of their lives. They rely on prayer and seek the best God has for them in their endeavors and in their personal relationships.

I liked how Nancy used the facts about Lane Bryant to further the story. She even uses the suffragette movement and the presidential election to great advantage.

This was an interesting read for me because I love history and I have been sewing for many years.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own.*


BACK COVER BLURB:
The American Dream thrives in 1912 New York City

Annie Wood, the housemaid-turned-pattern designer in The Pattern Artist, jumps at the chance to design her own clothing line when a wealthy New York couple offers to finance her endeavor. Joining the project is Annie’s new husband, Sean Culver, her best friend at Butterick, Maude Nascato, and a mother figure, Edna Holmquist.

Annie and her colleagues give up their careers, risking everything to follow a shared passion: clothes that are both fashionable and functional for modern, busy women in 1912.

Personal and financial setbacks test old relationships and new romances while threatening to keep the business from ever selling a single dress. No one said it would be easy. But the promise of the American Dream holds a deep hope for those who work hard, trust God, and never give up.


Available in digital ebook, hardcover and paperback:
BUY The Fashion Designer at Amazon
BUY The Fashion Designer at Christianbook.com

Comments

  1. I think this must have been fun to research! I'm all about costumes, patterns, fabric and making clothes, so maybe I'm biased? Thanks so much Paula!

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